mary, mary

It comes to mind that this site was based on a list.  And the list, like most things, is something I have become distracted from accomplishing.  Wallowing in despair over this is tempting, of course.  However, I have to acknowledge that some of the list has been fulfilled.  Case in point, sweet number 22: grow a garden.

In my family, gardening is a gene.  My grandma, Lola Mommy, was exceptional, a gardening genius.  She hummed and conversed with her plants.  She brought the dead to life.  These talents were distributed amongst her children, more or less.  My mom is quite brilliant at it.  She has a way with flowers particularly.  And she has a genuine love for it, for the art and practice, for the meditation of gardening.  

For me, I am still learning.  I am still learning to meditate and garden, and at the same time.  I also have a perverse love for reaping what I sow (in gardening, in gardening).  So, while I’ve planted a marigold or two, I confess I’m mostly absorbed in herbs and fruits.  They are my friends.

Take this old weber grill.  A few years ago, it was repurposed as the herb garden.  I planted all the essentials.  Basil, chives, sage, thyme, rosemary, oregano.  Fast forward to today, to this past spring, and I found that the chives, sage, thyme and oregano had resurrected themselves!  Alive!  They’re alive!  I screamed this manically for weeks.

ImageThe sage has been especially creepy and majestic.  It’s a sage I’ve never seen before.  It’s an alien mutation with curvy, curly branches that stretches out and around.  I am enthralled with it.  Thrilled.  Butter is, too.Image

As for other treasures I hope to revisit in future years, this year I planted…..

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Raspberries!  Heart be still!  A few finally bloomed their characteristic pink this week, and I nearly fainted.  I hear they become invasive.  Are they?  Are they?  I hope so.  I do like raspberry flavored everything.

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But we haven’t even discussed the point of gardening, the reason for it.  What is a garden?  When I think about why I garden, why anyone would garden, I realize that there’s something recreational in the endeavor, regardless of the hard work put into it.  A garden is a plot of land, growing something, that elicits enjoyment from its spectators.  So, we plant for beauty.  We plant for grace.  We plant for the wonder and joy of seeing something living sprout and grow from a seed.  We clasp our hands in prayer, forming mounds of the good earth.

I noticed something today.  This morning.  A cup of tea in my hand.  Gigi the shih tzu by my ankles.  A seed I didn’t have any expectations for:

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My heart grows and grows.

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5 thoughts on “mary, mary

  1. Yay for raspberries. They can become invasive, but it takes years for them to do so. The stalks you see this year shooting up will be the ones that bear fruit next year.Then, after bearing fruit, they will wither by the end of the year and the next year you can remove them to make room for the newer shoots that are waiting for their turn. Each year you need to clear out the deadwood and look for the new shoots – and since the new shoots come up from the roots, they’re likely to wander off into unpredictable areas (that’s the invasion part). You can dig them up early in the spring and reorganize them when they start to get this way. Here’s a pic that shows what they look like at that time of year: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ebarney/5295526679/

    The thorny branches are a pain to pick from if you don’t have them lined up and corralled, since they’ll flop over from their own weight and hide all your lovely berries – or worse, break under the weight of the fruit. Technically raspberries grown on “canes” not bushes or vines and they’re biannuals. But that doesn’t matter as much as learning to get them to grow happily on their terms and yours.

    • SO informative. thank you! i had no idea about the shoots and canes. and they are prickly, even now. i have my work cut out for me. but i will make you a pie when all this is through, over the next couple of years, em. thank you again!

  2. Pingback: for the very young, the very old | thirty things

some sugar

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